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October 5, 2006


AMiA Press Release: The Rev. Canon Ellis Brust accepts position with the AMiA

Staff Announcements at AMiA
Jay L. Greener
Oct 5, 2006

October 6, 2006

For Immediate Release

Contact:
Jay Greener

Anglican Mission in America Announces Staff Appointments

Anglican Mission in America (AMiA) today announced that the Rev. Canon Ellis E. Brust has accepted a call to executive leadership of the missionary movement as the current Executive Officer, Bob Devlin, completes his one year appointment. Canon Brust will take up the newly defined position of President that reflects AMiA’s preparation for its next phase of missionary growth and expansion. He will act as the principal executive officer responsible for daily operations, supervision of management and field staff as well as assisting with resource development. In addition, Canon Brust will work closely with Bishop Murphy and other leaders, both domestically and internationally, to implement AMiA’s current and future goals.

AMiA also announced that Cynthia P. Brust will join the AMiA staff as Director of Communications. She will be responsible for articulating the message and vision of AMiA for external and internal audiences, both domestic and international, as well as all aspects of strategic communications, including publications, educational resource materials, website and media relations. In addition, she will provide consultative services for field staff, networks and congregations.

“God has blessed AMiA significantly over the last six years such that the Mission has planted a new congregation about every three weeks, and we see that trend continuing to build momentum,” said the Rt. Rev. Chuck Murphy, Chairman of AMiA. “I believe we are poised to enter a new and exciting season, with some 43 churches in process.”

“I am confident that Ellis’ gifts, ministry background, leadership and administrative ability will enhance the mission as the Lord continues to move us from strength to strength. Cynthia brings a fresh vision and depth of experience for the communications department to build on the excellent work Jay Greener has accomplished,” Bishop Murphy added. It had previously been announced to leaders throughout the Anglican Mission that the Rev. Jay Greener, AMiA Communications Officer since 2002, has accepted a call as Rector of Church of the Redeemer in Highland Park, Illinois in order to
return to full-time parish leadership. “I’m genuinely grateful for Jay’s tireless and excellent efforts to establish our communication work, and havemknown for some time that he was considering a pastoral call. His role has been a significant one in the Mission’s development,” reflected Bishop Murphy.

Canon Brust currently serves as Chief Operating Office of the American Anglican Council (AAC) in Atlanta, GA, where he supervises daily operations of the organization, strategic planning/implementation, development of organizational structures and initiatives as well as fund development. He has also worked closely with international partners throughout the Anglican
Communion. Previously, Canon Brust served as Canon to the Ordinary in the Episcopal Diocese of Florida. Ordained in 1984, he served congregations in the Diocese of Northwest Texas and the Diocese of Texas for 14 years. Under his leadership, these churches experienced significant growth in membership, attendance, stewardship, mission and outreach. He holds an M. Div. from
Virginia Theological Seminary and a B.A. degree in psychology from Bethany College.

“Anglican Mission in America is faithfully and boldly proclaiming the Gospel of Jesus Christ, targeting the 130 million unchurched individuals in America,” said Canon Brust. “I am honored to join the leadership of this vital and growing Anglican missionary movement in North America, and I am committed to providing excellence in service for all levels of AMiA through the National Mission Resource Center.”

Mrs. Brust currently serves as Director of Communications for the AAC. In her position, she is responsible for executive level collaboration of mission, vision, strategy and message implementation for this international advocacy ministry as well as for all aspects of communications. Her professional experience encompasses a broad range of communications, public relations and advocacy in church-related, governmental, corporate and political arenas over the last 24 years, including serving as Press Secretary for U. S. Congressman Carroll A. Campbell, Jr. She is recognized for clarity and accuracy in message articulation and presentation as well as strategic communications. Mrs. Brust holds a B.A. degree in Religion and Political Science from Converse College, Spartanburg, South Carolina, and did graduate studies at the University of South Carolina College of Journalism in Mass Communications.

The Anglican Mission in America is a missionary movement of the Anglican Province of Rwanda charged with building an alliance of congregations committed to gathering, planting and serving dynamic congregations in the Anglican tradition. Committed to proclamation of the Gospel of Jesus Christ and built on the foundation of the authority of Scripture, AMiA offers a unique blend of the ancient and the future.


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39 comments

What a loss to the AAC!

[1] Posted by JackieB on 10-5-2006 at 03:52 PM · [top]

Can someone remind me the latest on the financial relationship between the ACC and the ACN?

[2] Posted by Going Home on 10-5-2006 at 03:59 PM · [top]

Timothy,
For the first year of the ACN, the AAC (not ACC) acted as the secretariet (spelling?) for the Network and helped fund it.  After a year, the ACN became self-sufficient.  Currently, the Network sends 50% of what it receives back out.  The Anglican Relief and Development Fund is doing a lot of great things.  Check out the ACN website.

Ryan+

[3] Posted by rreed on 10-5-2006 at 04:28 PM · [top]

BTW,
My prayers are with Ellis and Cynthia.  Great people.  Even more important, Great Commission people.  They’ll do well and so will the AMIA with their gifts and leadership.  In the end, Christ will be proclaimed and that is good for all of us.

R+

[4] Posted by rreed on 10-5-2006 at 04:30 PM · [top]

Thanks Ryan+, I didn’t know what functions, if any, the ACC still performed for the ACN.

This is another example of the exodus. Last one out, turn out the lights.

[5] Posted by Going Home on 10-5-2006 at 04:30 PM · [top]

Timothy,
I would love to see the “real” updated numbers of TEC.  It’s just a matter of time before there are so few people left, no one cares whether the lights are left on or not.  With all the endowments in TEC, they can leave the lights on for centuries while no one is home.  Meanwhile, the one Light that really matters has left the building.  Anyone seen the ECUSA “Lampstand” in a while?  Didn’t think so.

R+
Diocese of Fort Worth, Anglican Communion (just wishing)

[6] Posted by rreed on 10-5-2006 at 04:38 PM · [top]

You know, as dramatic as the past two weeks have been, I think this may be the event that may in fact seen as the most important event that has occurred in some time.  All of the AAC people have consistently pledged that they would stay in ECUSA for the long haul.  Now, I don’t mean this as a slam on the Brusts at all.  As said earlier, they are wonderful people.  I am quite confident that this decision was not made easily.  I am also quite confident that Canon Ellis and Cynthia are both people of God, and that they heard His call loud and clear—I don’t doubt that this was the right thing to do for them.
What I am doubting is . . . what does this move mean for what God may be telling me?  If it is time for people like the Brusts to move on, how much more time could God be wanting me to spend in ECUSA?
Besides the spiritual considerations, there must have been some practical reasons that Canon Ellis and Cynthia have made such a move.  Practical reasons that would confirm the spiritual calling anyway.  They know a lot more than the rest of us do about what is likely to happen next.  If they are getting off the good ship ECUSA, what does that say about Fr. Matt’s “Four Futures?”  Which one looks more likely now?
I don’t have any answers . . . just questions, and more and more . . . I have concerns.

[7] Posted by Eddie Swain on 10-5-2006 at 05:22 PM · [top]

This is indeed a huge loss for the AAC, and a great gain for AMiA. God bless everyone involved. Ellis and Cynthia are perhaps American Christendom’s best “package deal.”

I’ll just remind Ellis, though: Brother, when they joke about “the better half,” in your case at least, they’re not joking at all! That’s a good woman you got there, without whom you’d be holding a cardboard sign reading, “Will stir Anglican pot… for food.”

:D

[8] Posted by Greg Griffith on 10-5-2006 at 07:17 PM · [top]

It seems likely Ellis+ will leave his current position, but I wonder whether he will be leaving the AAC completely? The release says nothing at all regarding his position there other than noting that he has one.

[9] Posted by Matt Kennedy on 10-5-2006 at 07:36 PM · [top]

Father Reed, you have said it all.  These two people belong to God.  They rely on His wisdom and live under His truth.  They are going where He leads them.  Oh my, how He has blessed all of us through their work for Him!  They have worked tirelessly, especially throughout this year—it is the kind of never ending grueling pace that not many people can maintain for a very long period of time.  I hope they will take a good and well deserved rest before they report to their next assignment.  The AAC has four very large shoes to fill.

[10] Posted by BettyLee Payne on 10-5-2006 at 09:40 PM · [top]

Eddie, I don’t think it is a coincidence that the Brusts have been called out of TEC.  I don’t think it is a conicidence that 8 dioceses are seeking APO. I don’t think it is a conicidence that Christ Church, Plano has sought a more faithful path, as have many others from coast to coast. I don’t think it is a coincidence that the Kigali statement is calling for a separate orthodox Anglican province in the US.  We are in the midst of a movement of God, a Kairos moment, and if we open our eyes and look all around us I believe we will see many manifestations of this Kairos moment.  Praise and thanks be to God for providing faithful leaders and pathways for His children.

[11] Posted by BettyLee Payne on 10-5-2006 at 10:22 PM · [top]

I agree, Ms. Payne.  I see a tide of events demonstrating where God is headed and it does not appear to be the gradual, hesitant path that many would prefer and feel comfortable with.  The biggest question is whether the more institutional among the orthodox, including some Bishops, can adjust to react to what is happening. I am reminded of Esther 4:14 “For if you remain silent at this time, relief and deliverance for the Jews will arise from another place, but you and your father’s family will perish. And who knows but that you have come to royal position for such a time as this?”

[12] Posted by Going Home on 10-5-2006 at 10:52 PM · [top]

Ellis, Cynthia, the Lord prosper your charismata, your dunamis, and your energeion in this new calling (greek without proper parsing).  It fits so well with what you have learned with AAC, and provides new horizons to apply those lessons further with what the Holy Spirit has provided for you.  This seems the exact right kind of job for you, if not also the right place.
Blessings.

Neither of you are unaccustomed to tough questions, so I’d like to ask one knowing that you can handle it, in case others may be “wondering”, too, and that is an “if” question.  Was the AMiA job on the table on the day (and before) the SC election took place?  If so, what question could have been asked in the candidacy process that would have made it clear this was an option for you? 
Was there any “change of thought or heart” after the election was finished that allowed you to accept the AMiA position so soon after being willing to be elected a TEC bishop?
These questions could be helpful to other dioceses in their search process, if not for those like Eddie (above), who still feel called from the Lord to carry on in TEC for the time being, to understand quick change.
Thanks.
Fr. Rob Eaton

[13] Posted by Rob Eaton+ on 10-5-2006 at 11:05 PM · [top]

Chuck Murphy: “I believe we are poised to enter a new and exciting season, with some 43 churches in process.”

What does that tell you about where the future may be for vibrant Anglicanism in this Country ?

Perhaps Ellis and Cynthia, like the growing list of more and more Primates who are attending the AMiA Winter Conference each year, see a Bright Shining Star, rising in the East ...

May God bless and keep all those in the Anglican Community who follow the Great Commission .... and the Great Commandment ......

[14] Posted by Anglican Observer on 10-6-2006 at 06:57 AM · [top]

Somewhat related to this thread:

[15] Posted by tired on 10-6-2006 at 07:53 AM · [top]

What’s the problem, Fr. Eaton?  Do you acknowledge that the TEC has now changed so much that the same man could not be a bishop in either organization?  If so, that is not what the TEC lawyers are arguing in court all over the country.  You can’t have it both ways.

[16] Posted by GB on 10-6-2006 at 08:17 AM · [top]

Good grief.  What’s up with that?  Wasn’t this guy in the running for a bishop’s position?

[17] Posted by Widening Gyre on 10-6-2006 at 08:44 AM · [top]

WG,
He simply moved from one orthodox jurisdiction to another.

[18] Posted by Matt Kennedy on 10-6-2006 at 09:02 AM · [top]

I thought he was just changing jobs, Matt.  Will he have to change churches as part of the job?  Normally, we shouldn’t really care when people change jobs (they get to decide when the time and money is right).  This guy, though, is rather high-profile in AAC circles so it will be noticed (heck, he got his own press release after all).  Does AMiA issue press releases for all its new hires?

[19] Posted by Widening Gyre on 10-6-2006 at 09:18 AM · [top]

I read +Duncan’s statement as an attempt to blunt the impact of the Burst move to AMiA.  The +Minns development is likely a part of this as well because he had been somewhat critical of the AMiA approach, yet CANA is basically the same model, just a day late and a dollar short.  +Duncan’s letter is essentially saying that ACN is the gorilla in the orthodox movement, but events on the ground are saying otherwise.  It is not an accident that the Kigali statement came from a meeting of primates in Rwanda.  And wait until you see how many primates come to this year’s AMiA Winter Conference. They are already committing and don’t be surprised to see other GS province operations fold into AMiA as well. It is a model that is working and the GS primates are recognizing it.

My hunch is that the GS primates are getting fed up with ACN’s attempt to have their cake and eat it too i.e. stay in ECUSA yet claim some level of orthodox separation.  Question is, how do you explain that on the ECUSA Welcomes You sign leading into every little town in America?  Can’t be done.  There must be a clean break that can be clearly differentiated to the unchurched if evangelism is to take place.  AMiA has that model and hence it is growing leaps and bounds and not only at the expense of ECUSA parishes.

[20] Posted by AKB1 on 10-6-2006 at 08:41 PM · [top]

1) The Duncan statement is to respond to the cries of anguish that have been taking place over the past two weeks concerning the Camp Allen meeting.

2) The Global South Primates trade their meeting locations around from Province to Province.  Egypt, the site of their last meeting but one, was the site of a marvelous statement, also.

3) My understanding is that, given the election of Bishop Minns by Nigeria, he will be seated at Lambeth as a Nigerian bishop.  We’ll know if this is correct, I guess, at Lambeth.

4) There will no doubt be many Primates that come to the AMiA Winter Conference—as there were last year.  The Mere Anglicanism event has a COE bishop coming . . . so maybe Mere Anglicanism will be recognized by Rowan Williams as the “United States Archbishop of Canterbury”. 
; > )

5) Are there other sponsoring Primates of the AMiA than Archbishop Kolini?

6) There is plenty of evangelism of the unchurched taking place at ECUSA parishes . . . which means NOTHING concerning ECUSAs high level of corruption.

Can you not be happy for the Brusts and their new vocation/calling without the delusions of grandeur?

[21] Posted by Sarah on 10-6-2006 at 11:36 PM · [top]

I respect AMIA, and believe that most of the GS Primates are supportive of its efforts, including those that have seperately brought US churches under their wings. AMIA left when no one else would and took the debate beyond the theoretical to the real. They have some great churches. But they also have some small struggling parishes and, like the rest of the Anglican diaspora, seem to be having trouble establishing a clear public indentity.  The reality is that very few of the orthodox Anglican parishes in the US, inside or outside TEC, AMIA or otherwise, have room to boast. Everyone needs to be doing a better job of introducing people to Christ and keeping them in the pews.

As far as I can tell, the only substantive issue that divides AMIA from the other GS sponsored Anglican churches in the US, such as the Ugandan churches, is that some of the foreign jurisdictions allow female Priests and AMIA does not (although it apparently allows female Deacons).  The leaders need to figure out a way to deal with that issue in a way that allows both entities to ultimately unite.  There needs to be one recognizable non-TEC Anglican “brand” in the US.

[22] Posted by Going Home on 10-7-2006 at 01:53 AM · [top]

“There needs to be one recognizable non-TEC Anglican “brand” in the US.”

I agree.

[23] Posted by julia on 10-7-2006 at 02:35 PM · [top]

Sarah,

A nice attempt to blunt the impact of the departure of AAC’s chief, but not matter how hard you try, it still looks bad (especially from the perspective of our Worthy Opponents—see Daily Episcopalian and Mark Harris’s site). 

How could someone get to be the leader of one of our most visible reform movements (AAC) and then decide, whoops, my bad, this dog ain’t gonna hunt?

Well, I just re-read the AAC mission statement and I guess I was mistaken because it’s call to reform isn’t tied to reforming TEC at all; more of a general call to classical Anglicanism and support of the “orthodox.”  So maybe the difference between AAC and AiMA is really just a couple of letters.  Can anyone speak to this issue in greater detail?  Thanks.

[24] Posted by Widening Gyre on 10-9-2006 at 08:20 AM · [top]

RE: “Sarah, A nice attempt to blunt the impact of the departure of AAC’s chief, but not matter how hard you try, it still looks bad (especially from the perspective of our Worthy Opponents—see Daily Episcopalian and Mark Harris’s site).”

HUH?  Where did I attempt to “blunt the impact of the departure of AAC’s chief [sic]”??? [David Anderson is the CEO of the AAC.]

I responded to an obvious AMiA schill who was prattling on and on with numerous factual errors, which I corrected.  I said nothing further, that I can see, which attempted to “blunt the impact”.

Re: “How could someone get to be the leader of one of our most visible reform movements (AAC) and then decide, whoops, my bad, this dog ain’t gonna hunt?”

I think it’s fairly simple, Widening Gyre.  I haven’t talked with the Brusts, but I would guess that they felt called to work within an outside-communion entity.  You know, people do that all the time.  And I am frankly happy for the Brusts if God has called them to that.

Who knows, WG . . . I could decide to depart ECUSA as well.  Thousands are doing so every year.  It’s just the price that we pay for the times in which we live.  Many many many wonderful leaders within ECUSA have departed.  I think, for instance, of the great Rusty Reno who wrote the book “In the Ruins of the Church” and made an excellent argument for remaining within ECUSA

He is now Roman Catholic.

I like and value the AAC and the ACN.

Of the two, when a parish wishes to take strategic action WITHIN ECUSA, I always recommend the AAC as the best organization to help with that.  The ACN is the best organization with which a parish may “plant its flag”.  But to take strategic action within ECUSA . . . the AAC is the “bees knees” in my opinion.

[25] Posted by Sarah on 10-9-2006 at 08:47 AM · [top]

OK, I’ll chime in one this one more time and then let it rest…

1) The Duncan statement is to respond to the cries of anguish that have been taking place over the past two weeks concerning the Camp Allen meeting.

Maybe, but it did not strike me that way. Especially this: The Network remains the domestic key to what is ahead.  The GS primates are growing impatient.  I know this from personal experience. The attempt by the ACN to sort-of-seperate from ECUSA is not seen positively by many of them.  They are seeking bold action.

3) My understanding is that, given the election of Bishop Minns by Nigeria, he will be seated at Lambeth as a Nigerian bishop…

OK, so what? Not that anyone in AMiA cares too much, but AMiA bishops should seat under the same scenario as they are part of the House of Bishops of Rwanda. AMiA is in 110% communion with the GS primates, which is what matters right now.

My original reference to +Minns was just to make the point that Nigeria has now adopted the AMiA model (i.e. clean break) rather than the ACN model (i.e. fuzzy break).

4) There will no doubt be many Primates that come to the AMiA Winter Conference—as there were last year. 

The point is the momentum.  You read my initial post as some ill-wish to ACN.  That is not the case at all.  I left a church that was being crushed by one of the worse revisionist bishops in the US and ACN still has done nothing meaningful to help it.  The only message is, hold on, patience, etc.  I got sick of the inaction and now the only time that I waste on church political nonsense is a few minutes per week reading silly blogs!  smile

Nothing would please me more than to see ACN get its act together and start doing something bold.  They are faithful, but they are not bold.  If found their theme to be “wait, wait, wait, wait, wait” and AMiA to be “go, go, go, go, go.”

5) Are there other sponsoring Primates of the AMiA than Archbishop Kolini?
I can’t say for certain but indications are that there will be surprises at the winter conference.  I think this is a result of some of the GS primates being stretched too thin on the ground here and needing to build infrastructure for the congregations that they have taken on.  Nigeria is setting out to build this from ground up with +Minns, but others are looking to AMiA rather than starting from scratch.  ACN is not much help in this because ACN bishops won’t cross boundaries to help congregations is hostile territory.

6) There is plenty of evangelism of the unchurched taking place at ECUSA parishes . . . which means NOTHING concerning ECUSAs high level of corruption.
Again, I miss your point.  ECUSA has a mixed message right now as it is espousing two Gospels. The averge guy on the street can’t tell the difference in the reasserters vs. revisionists because 1) he does not know the difference, 2) everyone calls themselves ECUSA and the reasserters want to stay part of the church, but somehow have a level of seperation.  This is totally unexplainable to the masses that need evangelizing.  There has to be a clean break.  This is not a big theological issue in my mind, just simple marketing 101.  ACN is selling Truth and the rest of ECUSA is selling Death, but they are both bottled in the same can with the same wrapper and you have to read the fine print to tell the difference.  When Coca-Cola started selling “New Coke” back in the 80’s, consumers hated it and would not buy it.  But they also stopped buying the old Coke as well and sales plumetted across the board.  Same thing is happening here.

Can you not be happy for the Brusts and their new vocation/calling without the delusions of grandeur?
I don’t know the Brusts personally, but if they are as good as everyone here says they are, then I’ll trilled for them as we need additional leadership in AMiA to help manage the growth!!!

Finally, sorry for the tone of my first post.  Rereading it now, it clearly gave the impression that I am somehow anti-Network.  Not the case at all. I believe that in the end this will all play out with the GS primates leading all of the Common Cause partners together into a single Anglican expression.  My point is that none of us should have delusions of grandeur and should be working together rather than competing. I read +Duncan’s recent letter as defensive to the other Common Cause partners, many of whom are called to more bold actions now.

[26] Posted by AKB1 on 10-9-2006 at 11:54 AM · [top]

Re: “OK, so what? Not that anyone in AMiA cares too much, but AMiA bishops should seat under the same scenario as they are part of the House of Bishops of Rwanda. AMiA is in 110% communion with the GS primates, which is what matters right now.”

I am sure that people in AMiA don’t care.  But their bishops will not be seated at Lambeth, AKB1, because they are not recognized by Canterbury.  Again, I don’t think they care a bit—they are firmly pursuing the outside strategy.  But you stated that Minns was the same as AMiA, and I am correcting the record.  It is my understanding that Minns will be seated at Lambeth. 

If that is the case, then there is your difference between CANA and AMiA.

Re: “I can’t say for certain but indications are that there will be surprises at the winter conference. “

I can—the answer is no, there aren’t other sponsoring Primates than Rwanda’s Primate.  Perhaps there will be.  Who knows . . .

Re: “Again, I miss your point.  ECUSA has a mixed message right now as it is espousing two Gospels.”

My point was that I responded to this statement right here that you said earlier: “There must be a clean break that can be clearly differentiated to the unchurched if evangelism is to take place.  AMiA has that model and hence it is growing leaps and bounds . . . “

But evangelism is already taking place in numerous ECUSA parishes.

So . . . there does not have to “be a clean break . . . if evangelism is to take place”.

[27] Posted by Sarah on 10-9-2006 at 12:08 PM · [top]

The new AAC Mission Statement may be viewed:
<a > here </a>
In response to the earlier question about the mission statement of the AAC, it was changed in ‘05 to reflect the work being done throughout the Americas and the Communion and the fact that many AAC congregations were no longer a part of ECUSA and remained in the Network with overseas oversight.
BTW, more and more AMiA congregations are joining the AAC.
Carol

[28] Posted by SQ on 10-9-2006 at 01:21 PM · [top]

Fr. Rob, I do believe that Ellis Brust+, thought that being in the Dio. of SC, would eventually lead to “leaving” ECUSA.  As I understand it, the local nominee made that very plain.  I may be wrong, but there are only a few parishes who are insistant on staying, and take the liberal stance.

to: another poster here:

The big difference between the AMIA and the Network is, altho AMIA is definitely a Common Cause partner, they are still not recognized by the ABC….  Perhaps, that may change soon.. How could the Network who preach communion with the Anglican Communion join total forces with someone NOT recognized by it?

[29] Posted by Grandmother on 10-9-2006 at 02:34 PM · [top]

AKB1, without diving into the debate over who gets to have tea with the AOC at Lambeth, I agree with your observations about marketing.  This seems to be lost on many in this debate. The new TEC stats bear out that the ongoing confusion inhibiting the main work of the church.
To add to your New Coke analogy, I am reminded of the 1990 Perrier benzene contamination scandal. Prior to 1990, Perrier owned the premium US bottled water market.  The Company initially responded to stories about contamination (Pike, Spong?) by claiming that the incidents were isolated, not related to its primary production facilities and did not reflect a breakdown in its quality control (“the teaching of the church regarding marraige hasnt changed..”).  When this proved not to be true, people just quit drinking Perrier. It never regained its market share.
It would be very interesting to see a marketing survey to determine the “Episcopal” brand identification.  I suspect (but have no data to back this up) that over twenty years of headline grabbing innovations have created an image in the average person’s mind of a far left, universalist church, a denomination on the forefront of the gay activist movement.  Since the revisionist will continue to claim the “Episocpal” identity regardless of the outcome of this fight, the Episcopal brand will continue to be a drag on the efforts of the orthodox to communicate the Good News.  The sooner it is ditched, the better. The term “Anglican” may have less baggage, but we run the risk of contaminating that name as well in the public eye if it remains tagged with the Episcopal Church and the ongoing debate.
I realize that the Church is much more than marketing. But we name our churches for a reason, to convey who we are.  The name “Episcopal” no longer tells the right story.

[30] Posted by Going Home on 10-9-2006 at 03:05 PM · [top]

All, I’m by no means sure of what I’m about to write, but my understanding is that +Minns is actually quite different from AMiA bishops.

+Martyn is a bishop in Nigeria with canonical residence there now.

I do not believe that AMiA bishops are actually ordained as Rwandan bishops, but that they are irregular, hence the lack of recognition by the wider Communion.

My growing sense is that CANA is becoming an attempt to “redo” AMiA in a more orderly fashion, i.e. working in consultation with Communion leadership rather than independently.

I’m not trying to make any value judgments here or start a CANA vs. AMIA discussion.  (or even an AAC vs AMIA discussion). Just trying to get greater clarity and understand if there is actually a structural difference in terms of Communion legitimacy between +Minns and AMiA bishops.

Would appreciate folks who are in the know chiming in.

[31] Posted by Karen B. on 10-9-2006 at 03:16 PM · [top]

Karen - I would greatly appreciate some info on why some are in favor of AMiA and why some seem not to be.  It is particularly confusing in light of the Diocese of SC having a lawsuit against a church for joining AMiA - as I truly don’t have all the facts there and am trying to figure it out.  I hope your post does become a springboard for information from those in the know!

[32] Posted by Tami on 10-9-2006 at 03:23 PM · [top]

May God continue to bless the ministry ot the team “Ellis and Cynthia Brust.” It’s so much fun ministering that way!

[33] Posted by Bob Maxwell+ on 10-9-2006 at 03:25 PM · [top]

Karen, the Bishops of the Anglican Mission in America are in fact ordained as Bishops of L’Eglise Episcopal au Rwanda, directly under Archbishop Kolini.

[34] Posted by Anglican Observer on 10-9-2006 at 03:35 PM · [top]

Re: “I do not believe that AMiA bishops are actually ordained as Rwandan bishops, but that they are irregular, hence the lack of recognition by the wider Communion.”

Karen, I believe that they are indeed seated in the HOB of Rwanda during conventions and such.

I believe that the difference between Minns and the AMiA bishops is not provincial but in regards to acceptance by the ABC.

Tami, I think much of the differences between those who are “for” or “agin” are matters of where they place their values.  Some value being a part of the Anglican Communion very much and wish to attempt to reform the communion “from the inside”.  Some are more interested in starting over and having a church that is reformed within the US without having to work within ECUSA, and if the Anglican Communion comes alongside of that, that’s fine; if not, then that’s fine too.  Some of that latter group, though, really think that the Anglican Communion is lost as well and don’t have much interest at all in it.

I understand both approaches and am practicing the former approach.

[35] Posted by Sarah on 10-9-2006 at 03:43 PM · [top]

Thank you, Sarah.  That helps both in my understanding and in putting it into perspective with the Diocese of SC.

[36] Posted by Tami on 10-9-2006 at 04:34 PM · [top]

Sarah,

Just because I don’t want you to think I’m a complete nincompoop (see I can’t even spell), here is the first sentence from the Living Church article: “The Rev. Canon Ellis Brust, chief operating officer of the American Anglican Council (AAC) and one of three candidates in the episcopal election in the Diocese of South Carolina last month, has accepted a call to be president of the Anglican Mission in America (AMiA).”

So he is chief of something, right? As for my other errors and misunderstandings, I stand corrected.  For those who have explained the differences between all the A groups, thanks.

[37] Posted by Widening Gyre on 10-9-2006 at 05:27 PM · [top]

OK, I’ll bite again out of morbid curiosity.  As several have posted, Murphy, Greene, Barnum, etc. are seated in the Rwanda house of bishops as missionary bishops to America.  A tithe of local parishes goes to AMiA and a tithe of that goes to Rwanda.  They are every bit as much a bishop of Rwanda as Minns is in Nigeria.  The models are absolutely identical as far as I can see.

So my honest question is, where is the notion that +Minns is recognized by ABC any more or less than AMiA bishops coming from? Has ABC had some statement to that effect? I’ve seen nothing from Canterbury on the +Minns consecration that I can remember.

[38] Posted by AKB1 on 10-9-2006 at 09:03 PM · [top]

I just noticed that in Canon Brust’s answers to survey questions for Bishop of the Diocese of SC, he answered “disagree” to the question:  AMiA’s ministry and planned expansion in the Diocese of South Carolina is a good thing.  His answers can be found at: 
[url=http://www.stlukeandstpaul.org/diocese/Brust.pdf]http://www.stlukeandstpaul.org/diocese/Brust.pdf[/url]

I’m not saying his action of joining AMiA is a bad thing - just interesting/confusing in light of the survey answer.

[39] Posted by Tami on 10-10-2006 at 10:59 PM · [top]

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